Dental Implants and Roots
The key benefit of dental implants over other tooth replacement systems is that an implant connects directly to the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection, but functions just the same. When a tooth is lost, bone loss will eventually occur in that region because the root is no longer stimulating and stabilizing the bone. By using titanium–which biochemically joins to bone–to replace the root, you get a bond that more accurately replicates the one found in nature.
What Happens When You Lose a Tooth?
When you lose a tooth, especially a back tooth, you may feel you don’t need to replace it, since no one can see that it’s missing and you have plenty of other teeth. However, there is more bone loss going on under the surface once a tooth is lost. Surrounding each tooth is an alveolar bone that supports the tooth and when the tooth is lost, that bone basically melts away. This is why people who have lost most of their teeth and are not wearing dentures appear to have a caved-in appearance to their mouths.
Besides causing damage to the immediate area, tooth loss affects remaining teeth as well. Teeth create a structure for the face and their loss can shift the surrounding teeth, creating esthetic issues and bite problems. A lost tooth can also affect facial structures such as the jaw, muscles, jaw joints, and even the skin. If several teeth are lost, it’s not uncommon to suffer from social consequences and poor nutrition.

Extraction, Immediate  Implant  and Temporary restoration

Dental implants have progressed to the ultimate in tooth replacement. In many instances, we are able to place an implant immediately upon removal of a tooth and even create a temporary on the implant in the same visit. We have been performing immediate restorations on implants for greater than nine years and considers it one of the most gratifying procedures performed in our practice.  The psychological impact of having an esthetic tooth replacement that stays in your mouth while the implant heals cannot be understated.

For the patient, the main advantage for immediate replacement and provisionalization is fewer surgical visits as well as providing immediate esthetics that are virtually indistinguishable to the original tooth.

The benefits of immediate implants are clear. The conventional method of therapy involves the removal of a tooth, then a healing period of 4-6 months prior to implant placement. Following an additional 6-8 weeks, the implant can be finally restored with a crown. A temporary removable appliance is worn during this healing process. Whereas, a patient with a temporary tooth created on an immediate implant will have an esthetic tooth restoration the day the tooth is lost. Importantly, an immediately placed implant and temporary preserves the tissues and prevents the natural collapse of the jaw bone which is seen immediately following the removal of a tooth.

Immediate  Implants and Bone Graft

The simple extraction of a tooth leaves in its wake a hole that is surrounded by a shell of alveolar bone (tooth supporting bone). This bone’s only purpose in the human body is to support a tooth. As a result, when the tooth is lost the body quickly begins to reabsorb the bone, unless it is immediately replaced with either, an  “implant” or  a “ridge preservation graft” (socket graft).

It is possible to place an implant at the time of a tooth extraction. In these cases, the implant will act almost like a tent pole to hold the surrounding bone up and give it the functional requirements necessary to prevent it from undergoing atrophy.

Unfortunately, often times it is impossible to place an implant at the time of the extraction. This can be for many reasons. However, it is most frequently due to either the presence of a dental infection or a size discrepancy between the tooth that is being lost and any possibility of an immediate implant replacement. In these cases it is prudent to place a “ridge preservation graft.” The ridge graft is designed to fill the void left by the extracted tooth and hold the volume of this space while natural bone has the opportunity to proliferate and fill the space with high quality live bone. Depending on the size of the tooth that was extracted, the ridge graft requires between three to six months before an implant can be placed.

Sinus Lift

A sinus lift is surgery that adds bone to your upper jaw in the area of your molars and premolars. It’s sometimes called a sinus augmentation. The bone is added between your jaw and the maxillary sinuses, which are on either side of your nose. To make room for the bone, the sinus membrane has to be moved upward, or “lifted.”

What It’s Used For

A sinus lift is done when there is not enough bone height in the upper jaw, or the sinuses are too close to the jaw, for dental implants to be placed.